Chapter two.


Two men looked out from prison bars. One saw mud, the other saw stars.

A year ago today I was taken to Ninewells hospital in an ambulance by two wonderful paramedics. I was met by a fantastic team of nurses who worked quickly, efficiently and professionally. They couldn’t find any of my veins as my blood pressure was too low, my heart rate too high, and I was in two much pain. I was experiencing referred pain in my shoulder tips, repeatedly saying “it hurts up here, it hurts up here!” whilst clutching my shoulders. I was taken for x-rays, I heard the words “nil by mouth” being thrown around and I remember the look of absolute terror on my poor Mums face, she was petrified. I remember a wash of blue scrubs as more and more nurses surrounded me, the occasional green scrub peeking in, standing calmly at the doorway: assessing the situation. I remember the morphine, and then slipping in and out of consciousness. I remember signing forms, being told I needed surgery, there would be a possibility of a bag. I remember phoning Matthew and wondering if it would be the last time I’d speak to him, the last time I’d hear his beautiful voice, I remember the tears, nothing hurt anymore when the fear took over. I remember thinking if I would be able to look down on my family if I did die, if I could make sure they were all okay, I remember questioning my atheism, my distrust in religion, was I really about to find out if it were all true or not? I remember praying, to every and any God there were out there: save me. I remember my parents face through the surgical doors, I felt tiny, as though I were shrinking into the bed, it wasn’t happening to me, it couldn’t be happening to me, surely? I remember the tubes, the beeping, the injections, the soft scent of vanilla as they placed the mask over my face. One last look before the cool liquid penetrated my veins, swimming around my body, blackening my senses and drowning out reality, I remember choking on my tears, then darkness.
I woke up. Awake. I was alive. It hadn’t happened to me though, it was a nightmare, right? I tenderly touched my stomach, it felt hard, wrapped in bandages. I felt my gagging reflexes respond as the tube draining my stomach content hit against the back of my throat, irritating the inside of my nose. I remember the main line, feeding drugs under my rib cage and straight to my heart. My beating heart. The monitor lines pressed onto my chest were itchy and I couldn’t verbalise my annoyance. Then I slept. I slept a lot.
I awoke in The High Dependency Unit, confused, sore and upset. I couldn’t do anything myself. A tube fed me, a different tube let me urinate, a nurse bathed me, drugs kept me sedated. I lay there for what felt like months. I remember sleeping again, there was a lot of sleeping.
Then I remember my Dads hand gripping mine as I had my wound changed, I remember looking at my stomach and feeling repulsed by what I saw, disgusted and terrified. I didn’t look again, I just cried, not caring who heard my sobs. I remember my first steps, like a child, just to the window and back. I remember my first meal; clear soup and jelly, it was delicious. I remember learning and trying to understand what had happened to my body. I remember my wonderful surgeons, my doctors, my heroes.
Then months of pain. Three more surgeries, countless journeys to the hospital, phone calls to NHS 24, A&E, hundreds of tablets, sleepless nights. I remember a lot. Sometimes, too much. Other times I wish I could forget it all ever happened, forget I have this illness for life. But then I remember how grateful I am. Everything that has happened has taught me a new lesson. I may not have loved every minute, but I wouldn’t change it for the world.

Here’s to the many, many years to come!